You are currently browsing the Chapter 48: A Meditation on Sound category

A MEDITATION ON SOUND

§ December 6th, 2009 § Filed under Chapter 48: A Meditation on Sound § Tagged , , , , , , , § 2 Comments

 

Can you hear the ocean? The area of this photograph is about 1/4 inch across. Yet every sound in earshot echoes around inside the shell. The size of this tiny shell is about the size of the two membranes inside your head that are the only tissue in the human body that can detect sound. Valuable real estate, I'd say.

Can you hear the ocean? The area of this photograph is about 1/4 inch across. Yet every sound in earshot echoes around inside the shell. The size of this tiny shell is also just about the size of the two membranes inside your head that are the only tissue in the human body that can detect sound. Valuable real estate, I'd say.

          [This chapter continues the “assignment” from my Spirit Guide, See Do, to examine the complexities of our mundane reality. The specific construct given me to examine is a hypothetical cube ¼ inch on a side, floating in the air about a foot in front of my face. These meditations on our temporal reality will be followed by an examination of “See Do reality.”]

            The sound waves you’ll find in our little cube work a bit differently than the way the electromagnetic spectrum(photons) propagates. Electromagnetic energy needs no medium to move through. Photons travel just as well, if not better, through a vacuum. But sound is different. Sound energy travels through a medium by vibrating the molecules of that medium at specific frequencies. These vibrations travel out through the medium until they lose their energy.

            So if you put a microphone inside our little cube of air we would hear all the sound around you. Depending on where you might be, that could be an enormous amount of information.

            Where I’m sitting I can hear the din of the city of Chicago, which could probably be broken down into its constituent voices. Buses, cars, trucks, brakes screeching, horns honking, gears shifting, a motorcycle frapping away, an occasional loud voice, rooftop air conditioners, jet planes, a helicopter, the sound of the subway coming up through vents in the street, a police siren, my neighbor at his door, and oh yeah, the wind. And if I’m lucky, an occasional bird. There’s also the sound of my own typing, breathing, moving in my chair, and swallowing. My refrigerator makes a humming and its ice maker will rattle. The clock on the wall ticks and the air unit gently hisses. If only there were some music playing.

            All of this information is vibrating the air molecules in our cube. And these molecules are sending on all of those vibrations on to the adjacent air molecules with only a minuscule loss of energy. And they are passing those vibrations on at over six hundred miles an hour, in all directions. Yeah, six hundred plus miles an hour. Right in our cube. That’s why it’s called the speed of sound.

            You should think about these things. Actually, you should meditate on the complexity of it all. This is our normal, mundane reality. It’s not so simple as you might have allowed yourself to think. Meditate on it and you’ll see that it is all very connected. It overlaps, blurs, overflows, mingles and reverberates everything else. This is scientific fact. All basic stuff. And we haven’t even gotten to the juicy stuff.

            Look at your cube. Think about what’s there. It’s good. Real good.

            — continued  (Next: The zero frequency radiation that’s saving your life.)

Share